International News


Down with Le Pen, Trump, and Anti-Neoliberal “Left” Collaborationism

 
by Andrew Kliman

 
Jean-Luc Mélenchon, a supposed far-left anti-neoliberal politician, came in fourth in yesterday’s first-round voting for the French presidency. He then announced that he won’t call on supporters to defeat neo-fascist Marine Le Pen of the National Front by voting for centrist Emmanuel Macron in the runoff election. Meanwhile, former Trotskyist and present left-media star Tariq Ali is calling for a mass abstention from voting in the second round.

Some months ago, it might just barely have been possible to think that such people were well-meaning but misguided––that they had illusions that Donald Trump wouldn’t be so bad once he took office, that his candidacy represented a repudiation of politics (“anti-politics”) rather than proto-fascist politics, etc. But Le Pen heads a political party, and that party has been plying its neo-fascist politics for 45 straight years. What part of “National Front” don’t they understand? Read More

The Social Crisis in Greece

 

by Ta Paidia Tis Galarias (TPTG), March 2017

 

INTRODUCTION: The Capitalist Crisis in the European Union

Before discussing the conditions in which the social crisis in the South of Europe has been developing, we should refer first to the more general context of the crisis in the EU itself.

For us, the global “economic recession” and the “financial” crisis of the recent years are only forms of appearance of the permanent crisis of capital reproduction which started in the early 70’s, that is, the crisis of reproduction of capitalist social relations. Despite the fact that there were periods of “recovery”, e.g. the partial restoration of non-financial profit rates in many major capitalist economies from 1982 to 1997, no long-term solution to the crisis has been found. Read More

Escalation is the order of the day in Syria

April 23, 2017 by  

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by Ralph Keller

 
On 7 April, US president Donald Trump ordered 59 Tomahawk missiles to be fired on Al Shyrat Airfield outside Homs in Syria [1].

This was a response to the Sarin gas attack on the rebel-held town of Khan Shaykhun three days earlier, for which the Syrian government is clearly responsible. Its ally, Russia, did nothing to stop the gas attack, which claimed the lives of men, women and children. Donald Trump justified the missile strike by saying that “[i]t is in the vital national security interest of the United States to prevent and deter the spread and use of deadly chemical weapons” [2]. To many, the strike comes as a surprise and is even seen as a U-turn on Donald Trump’s non-interventionist stance during his election campaign. Be it as it may, we have seen a clear measure of escalation in terms of the US’ involvement in the Syrian civil war so far. Read More