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Books by Raya Dunayevskaya

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Marxism and Freedom, from 1776 to Today (first edition New York: Bookman Assoc.1958; latest edition Amherst, NY: Humanity Books). In her first book, Dunayevskaya relates the 18-19th century industrial, social-political and intellectual revolutions to the development of revolutionary thought; presents Marx’s 1844 humanist essays (the first edition included the first English translations); four chapters contain her seminal interpretations of aspects of Marx’s Capital; gives her analysis of the Russian Revolution’s transformation into state-capitalism; and ends with chapters on automation and Maoism (the last added in 1964). Includes the first edition’s introduction by Herbert Marcuse and later introductions by the author.

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Philosophy and Revolution: From Hegel to Sartre, and from Marx to Mao (first edition New York: Dellacort/Dell Publishing 1973, latest edition Lanham, MD: Lexington Books). Dunayevskaya’s second book traces the revolutionary philosophy of Hegel, including her interpretation of “absolute negativity as new beginning;” and highlights of Marx’s “new continent of thought;” and Lenin’s “philosophic ambivalence.” She then examines the theories of Trotsky, Mao and Sartre, and finally the “economic reality and dialectics of liberation in the 1960s-1970s revolts in Africa, Eastern Europe and the U.S. Includes an introduction by Erich Fromm and additional material from her work in the 1980s.

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Rosa Luxemburg, Women’s Liberation and Marx’s Philosophy of Revolution (first edition Humanities Press: Atlantic Highlands, NJ 1983, latest edition U. of Ilinois Press: Urbana and Chicago). Hoping the women’s liberation movement would delve into theory, Dunayevskaya introduced Luxemburg’s then-unknown feminist dimension. The book also includes a critique of Luxemburg’s theories of accumulation of capital—a matter still hotly contested today. The second section gives highlights of the history of the women’s movement “as revolutionary force and reason;” the third revisits Marx from his earliest to last works, including his Critique of the Gotha Program, which the author sees pointing a direction for our time. Includes a forward by Adrienne Rich.

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Women’s Liberation and the Dialectics of Revolution: Reaching for the Future (Wayne State U. Press: Detroit, MI 1985). The last book edited by Dunayevskaya, this collection of short pieces about women’s thought and activity, mostly from the 1950s to the 1980s, reveals the development of her own thinking into the philosophy of Marxist-Humanism. It takes up miners’ wives and women in the work force, African-American women from slavery to the feminist movement, and women in revolts and revolutions in Russia, Iran, Portugal, Poland, China and more. Good book for classes on feminism as well as for seeing her philosophy in action.

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