Editorial

  •   A controversy is raging in the United States, and internationally, in the aftermath of the white supremacist marches, assaults, threats, and near takeover of Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 11 and 12. Their “Unite the Right” demonstrations led to the murder of Heather Heyer, a 32-year old white counter-demonstrator, when a neo-Nazi drove a car into the counter-demonstration—a deliberate act of domestic terrorism. Nineteen other people were injured by the car, and another 15 were injured in separate assaults. President Trump expressed his dismay at the death but blamed “many sides.” It took him until Monday, two days later, to call out the white supremacists, neo-Nazis and KKK (the infamous Ku Klux Klan, who have terrorized African-Americans ever since Emancipation). He read out the words condemning them from his teleprompter, without conviction. Then, on Tuesday, in a rant-filled press conference devoted to clarifying his position, he asserted that the “Unite the Right” demonstrators included “many” “very fine people” and reverted to his initial claim that “both sides” were to blame for the violence. His absurd equation of fascists with those protesting them is now the focus of debate throughout the country and elsewhere. Leaders of Britain and Germany have spoken [...]

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